Featured Fuse® Locations

Introducing Fuse®
Full Spectrum Endoscopy®

Colonoscopy saves lives. The fact remains, however, that traditional, forward-viewing (TFV) colonoscopes miss many pre-cancerous polyps. Full Spectrum Endoscopy® (Fuse®) is revolutionizing colonoscopy by providing a full 330° view of the colon, almost double the view of traditional, forward-viewing colonoscopes. A study recently published in The Lancet Oncology revealed that Fuse found 76% more polyps than traditional, forward-viewing colonoscopes.

 

Click Here to View The Lancet Study

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What Makes Fuse® Colonoscopy Unique?

It’s been twenty years since we’ve seen any real innovation in the medical exam known as colonoscopy. To date, standard scopes give the physician a limited 170 degree field of view. Fuse Full Spectrum Endoscopy is revolutionary in its ability to provide a full 330 degree field of view, giving your gastroenterologist the ability to see more of the colon and thus the ability to detect more pre-cancerous polyps.

Fuse® Field of View

VS.

Traditional Field of View

What leading physicians & patients are saying…

From large hospitals and national healthcare organizations to smaller private practices and outpatient centers, Fuse has provided gastroenterologists a world-class view so that they can better detect pre-cancerous polyps before they become dangerous.
  • …It’s a pretty remarkable technology, for a long time we’ve been wanting to see out the sides; now we can!
    Douglas K. Rex, M.D.
    Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Indiana University, Chancellor’s Professor at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, and Director of Endoscopy at Indiana University Hospital in Indianapolis
  • The Fuse system completely changes the field of endoscopy at a time when the importance of seeing more anatomy and improving the quality of GI endoscopy is at the forefront.
    David Carr-Locke, MD
    Professor of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Chief, Division of Digestive Diseases, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY
  • EndoChoice’s innovative Fuse technology dramatically improves the effectiveness of colonoscopy, a life-saving procedure.
    Ian Gralnek, MD
    Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and Department of Gastroenterology, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel
  • Traditional endoscopes provide about 170 degrees of forward vision. The advantage of Fuse is that, now, I can see nearly twice that amount…330 degrees.
    Peter Siersema, MD, PhD
    Professor of Gastroenterology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands
  • The importance of seeing everything possible while getting a colonoscopy cannot be over-emphasized.  It’s difficult enough to get people to have a colonoscopy, the least you can do is offer peace of mind that everything that could be found, is actually being found. Click here to view David's Fuse Experience.
    David Dubin
    Founder of AliveAndKickn, three time genetic cancer survivor

Insist on Fuse® Colonoscopy

Innovation is hard. For 20 years, doctors have used the same old technology – looking at the colon with blinders on. There’s a reason why saying someone has “tunnel vision” is often a negative comment. When your view is limited, you end up missing things. Potentially important things. That’s why the innovators at EndoChoice® wanted to create a technology that removed the blinders – so doctors could see what they’ve been missing for 20 years. We watched too many of our loved ones become diagnosed with colon cancer. We couldn’t just sit around and wait for someone else to develop more effective technology for finding polyps. Cancer is too serious to allow it to go undetected.

According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States when men and women are considered separately, and the second leading cause when both sexes are combined.  CRC is expected to cause approximately 50,830 deaths this year while another 150,000 new cases will be diagnosed.